Minority languages and popular science

Elhuyar magazine was born in 1974 with the aim of adapting Basque language to science and technical fields; therefore, since its birth, Elhuyar has granted especial relevance to research done in the Basque Country.
0
The conquest of readers

The huge responsibility of the media lies in the fact that citizens have the right to science information, to help them take better decisions, nurture a critical spirit, and form their own opinions.
0
The two cultures

The relationship between scientists and journalists is better than its image would suggest. Scientists not only believe that public communication is a duty, but also that media visibility is beneficial.
0
The science of the press

Communicating science effectively and rigorously is still one of the many challenges facing scientists and researchers today. Indeed, in the current context it is more important than ever to involve society in the work undertaken at universities and research centres.

0
The Survival of Silk Landscapes

The landscape of Alzira, Carcaixent, La Pobla Larga and other neighboring towns of La Ribera is almost exclusively planted with orange groves now. But in many of them we can

0
Past in the Present

It is true that the cycle of silk does not go, as happened for centuries, hand in hand with Mediterranean peoples. Currently, the production of silk is up to Asian

0
Edible Childhood Ethnobotany

[caption id="attachment_14781" align="alignleft" width="200"] Guildhall Art Gallery (Londres)John Everett Millais. The Woodsman's Daughter, 1850-51. Oil on canvas, 64,7 x 88,9 cm. The author describes a countryside scene with a boy offering strawberries,

0
Carles Puche

Journalist Carme Puche shares one of the many conversations she had with her father Carles Puche, scientific illustrator, about the importance of drawing science.

0
112-79

Few are those who reject interdisciplinary work, though few are also, interestingly, those who practice it. What is a discipline? It is a kind of knowledge, a way of understanding

0
Foto cireres

Cherries, plums, peaches, apricots and almonds are all fruit of trees of the Prunus genus. Cherries, in particular, are the fruit of Prunus avium, and there are around 900 varieties in production worldwide.
0
108-79

The activity we present to you today will help you observe and realise the vast range of colours that exist in nature, and will also make you have a nice

0
106-79eng

In the previous issue of Mètode I wrote about the Mars One project, which intends to send 24 colonists to Mars. The conclusion was that it looked like a spectacular scam.

0
103a-79

In 1949, the Scottish scientist John Boyd Orr was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace for his efforts to fight world hunger.
0
Socioecologia Dieta

One fine day I found I had a Mediterranean diet. Just as Molière’s character, who was happy to learn he was speaking in prose, I experienced the satisfaction of right and proper eating. It turns out humankind feeds wrong.

0
Kingsley navegant 1200

Until relatively recently, women have had problems gaining access to jobs traditionally taken by men such as medicine, professorships and research. Some women, however, like the three given as examples in this article, managed to become pioneers in the most difficult disciplines and areas requiring utmost dedication.

0
76b77-79

Humboldt and Darwin belonged to different generations and their approaches to the study of nature differed. However, they had something in common: their lives were shaken up and changed course after their respective journeys, which marked the starting point of their fruitful scientific careers.
0

From the seventeenth century on, problems in physics became the object of careful study. The expeditions were made to acquire otherwise unobtainable data, needed to study specific problems in physics.
0

In the late eighteenth century, the Spanish Crown, like other monarchies, began promoting expeditions which, as well as laying claim on the territories visited, compiled studies and catalogues of their natural resources. On their return, however, most members of these expeditions met with misunderstanding and neglect by the very institutions that had promoted the mission.
0
56a-79

Between 1716 and 1717, Joan Salvador i Riera, an apothecary from Barcelona and Antoine de Jussieu, a professor of botany at Le Jardin du Roi in Paris, travelled the roads of Spain and Portugal, sometime by calash, sometimes on mule back, to make «botanical observations». This article provides a brief overview of the Salvador family and a glimpse of the journey made by these two naturalists.

0
36-79

Popular science finds itself in a new scenario where a shortage of information has been replaced by abundant and often freely available knowledge sources. Although often produced by amateurs, such information may be of a similar or even better quality than that produced professionally. Consequently, there is greater collaboration between professionals and amateurs, making it more difficult to distinguish between them. 
0
32a-79

The KNP (Kruger National Park) is not another one of the thousands of protected areas in the world: 260 km long, more than two million hectares, 900 km of fence,

0
22-79

A slow yet extremely reflexive writer We have to recognise it: without Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), Darwin may have never published The Origin of Species. Retired in his house in Down,

0
11-79

English physicist and writer Charles Percy Snow (1905-1980) sometimes asked representatives of the so-called «traditional culture» – humanism for him – if any of them could explain the second law

0
JMLlovet-2

«I try to transfer my research findings and knowledge to patients». Josep Maria Llovet describes his job in these words. He is one of the main world experts in liver

0