Much of the plastic debris fractures into micro- or nanoparticles called microplastics that can be ingested by marine organisms.

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Contact with nature generates measurable benefits for people’s psychological and physiological health.

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Mètode 114 One health: un món, una salut

Although a One Health perspective has, in one way or another, been around at least since the time of Hippocrates, the term itself was coined by William Karesh in a

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Marylène Patou-Mathis

In her latest book, L'homme préhistorique est aussi une femme, the prehistorian Marylène Patou-Mathis delved right into the clichés and stereotypes about prehistoric women.

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Lori Marino

Having taught at Emory University (Atlanta, US) for two decades, Lori Marino is the founder and Executive Director of The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy and founder and President of the

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Our evolution developed a series of technical innovations such as the control of fire, agriculture and railways, which transformed not only the way we eat, but also the way we live.

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Amman

What made urban experiments possible at the end of the Holocene? What selective pressures made cities more successful than other alternatives?

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Associating feelings of pleasure with dopamine us a common mistake. The process involves many other elements. Humans permanently seek pleasure and the continuous generation of expectations, surprise, and desire.

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The most widely accepted hypothesis holds that social norms were shaped by processes of cultural selection between human groups with different rules on how to organise social life.

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Much of the archaeological evidence left by humans shows the strategies they adopted in terms of mobility, the structure of exchange networks, and the evidence of their inhabiting an environment that they quickly learned to manage and appropriate.

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To talk about life is to talk about cooperation. In a world dominated by Darwinian competition, how has cooperation come to play such an important role?

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societats

Building on the evolutionary basis of cooperation, this monograph looks at human social structures, from the most ancient and simple to the most complex of modern societies.
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Avocado plantations

This text explores two of the most important economic activities in Latin American drylands: agriculture and mining; as well as the impact of climate change on the availability of water resources and the consequent power struggles.

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Livestock grazing modifies and even degrades arid ecosystems, which threatens the sustainability of livestock farming itself.

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Desertification is a global environmental challenge requiring a response validated by both science and politics.
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Drylands contain great biodiversity. Their extension is growing due to climate change, so it is more and more essential to get to know more about them.
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The texts in this monograph try to help us to understand the importance of drylands and the need for their development go hand in hand with the protection of their resources.
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With a completely colonised Earth, we must look after the environment and be pioneers of a new status quo based on climate neutrality.

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The trade in wild species generates great economic wealth on a global scale. The regulation of this trade must take into account many complexities.

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If we hang a magnet by a thread, it always aligns itself in the same direction, even if there is no other magnet nearby. This is a compass and responds to the Earth's magnetism.

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Genetics and language are closely connected. Some genes in humans have been essential for the development of complex language.

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We can find many physics and biology errors in Star Wars, but let's take a look at ecology.
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When we are having a conversation, walking together, or simply sitting next to someone else, our postures and movements are coordinated.

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Tactile memory allows us to create images in our brain thanks to the relative positions of fingers and hands.
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