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The outbreak of H5N1 avian influenza declared in October 2022 in an American mink farm in Galicia is concerning because of the level of transmission from animal to animal.

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Nuclear fusion energy has great advantages. The latest discoveries in this field made by the National Ignition Facility in the United States have great scientific significance.

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The process that takes place when we cook on a barbecue is very similar to the one that occurs in our organism when we eat and digest food.

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Andreas Wagner

We talk to evolutionary biologist Andreas Wagner, a reference in the study of evolutionary innovations.

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The debate about the perception of beauty by non-human animals has no simple answer. This article analyses the relationship between natural selection and aesthetic criteria.

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In a world where it seems best to go unnoticed, many creatures display their beauty in plain sight. We could even say that we are surrounded by beauty. A diverse

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Communication research can reinforce vaccination uptake, a key public health tool, as seen during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Much of the plastic debris fractures into micro- or nanoparticles called microplastics that can be ingested by marine organisms.

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The emergence of new zoonotic diseases reminds us that humans, animals, and the environment are interconnected.

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The next time you find yourself near a barbecue, try to pay attention to what you see. It is a fascinating scientific process.

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Contact with nature generates measurable benefits for people’s psychological and physiological health.

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This article proposes an effort to make the most of the potential of social sciences and thus reimagine the concept of One Health.

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Wild animals can be environmental watchdogs that inform us about antimicrobial resistance.

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Mètode 114 One health: un món, una salut

Although a One Health perspective has, in one way or another, been around at least since the time of Hippocrates, the term itself was coined by William Karesh in a

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Ants are as common as they are special. They can be found in nearly every corner of the Earth, and their ability to organise themselves is remarkable.

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Marylène Patou-Mathis

In her latest book, L'homme préhistorique est aussi une femme, the prehistorian Marylène Patou-Mathis delved right into the clichés and stereotypes about prehistoric women.

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Epidemiological surveillance of viruses based on wastewater is a very useful tool for studying diseases, as is the case with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

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Lori Marino

Having taught at Emory University (Atlanta, US) for two decades, Lori Marino is the founder and Executive Director of The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy and founder and President of the

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Humans have a series of biases, including survivorship bias. Some of them seem to be adaptive, and others, limitations in our ability to assimilate information.

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Recent advances in complex systems research, computer-based simulations, and large-scale databases, are paving the way towards fully developing a mathematical theory of human history.

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Our evolution developed a series of technical innovations such as the control of fire, agriculture and railways, which transformed not only the way we eat, but also the way we live.

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Amman

What made urban experiments possible at the end of the Holocene? What selective pressures made cities more successful than other alternatives?

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Associating feelings of pleasure with dopamine us a common mistake. The process involves many other elements. Humans permanently seek pleasure and the continuous generation of expectations, surprise, and desire.

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The most widely accepted hypothesis holds that social norms were shaped by processes of cultural selection between human groups with different rules on how to organise social life.

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