The search for certainty in a world that is often so binary – where choosing between two options seems to be the better (and simpler) alternative – gives meaning to

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The correlations between art and nature have been independent of the contextualising filter of human cultural history and corresponding scientific developments.
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The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the Arts & Crafts movement sought in nature and medieval legends the authenticity they considered lost.
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Every species' mate choice is determined by what individuals consider beautiful. Beauty has a biological meaning shared by many species.

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Throughout evolution, sexually reproducing animals have used the process of beauty recognition to maximise their attractiveness to the opposite sex.

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The debate about the perception of beauty by non-human animals has no simple answer. This article analyses the relationship between natural selection and aesthetic criteria.

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In a world where it seems best to go unnoticed, many creatures display their beauty in plain sight. We could even say that we are surrounded by beauty. A diverse

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Wild animals can be environmental watchdogs that inform us about antimicrobial resistance.

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The emergence of new zoonotic diseases reminds us that humans, animals, and the environment are interconnected.

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Contact with nature generates measurable benefits for people’s psychological and physiological health.

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Communication research can reinforce vaccination uptake, a key public health tool, as seen during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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This article proposes an effort to make the most of the potential of social sciences and thus reimagine the concept of One Health.

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Mètode 114 One health: un món, una salut

Although a One Health perspective has, in one way or another, been around at least since the time of Hippocrates, the term itself was coined by William Karesh in a

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Recent advances in complex systems research, computer-based simulations, and large-scale databases, are paving the way towards fully developing a mathematical theory of human history.

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Our evolution developed a series of technical innovations such as the control of fire, agriculture and railways, which transformed not only the way we eat, but also the way we live.

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Amman

What made urban experiments possible at the end of the Holocene? What selective pressures made cities more successful than other alternatives?

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The most widely accepted hypothesis holds that social norms were shaped by processes of cultural selection between human groups with different rules on how to organise social life.

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Much of the archaeological evidence left by humans shows the strategies they adopted in terms of mobility, the structure of exchange networks, and the evidence of their inhabiting an environment that they quickly learned to manage and appropriate.

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To talk about life is to talk about cooperation. In a world dominated by Darwinian competition, how has cooperation come to play such an important role?
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societats

Building on the evolutionary basis of cooperation, this monograph looks at human social structures, from the most ancient and simple to the most complex of modern societies.
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Avocado plantations

This text explores two of the most important economic activities in Latin American drylands: agriculture and mining; as well as the impact of climate change on the availability of water resources and the consequent power struggles.
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Livestock grazing modifies and even degrades arid ecosystems, which threatens the sustainability of livestock farming itself.
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Desertification is a global environmental challenge requiring a response validated by both science and politics.
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Drylands contain great biodiversity. Their extension is growing due to climate change, so it is more and more essential to get to know more about them.
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