former building of the Institute for Experimental Biology

Academic life in Vienna was hit harder by National Socialism than anywhere else in Germany, due to the high numbers of scientists of Jewish origins.
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Scientists supported Nazi ideologies and policies in many ways
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This monograph seeks precisely to show the level of involvement of the German academic world with Nazi postulates.
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dna human remains

Technological advances in the study of our genome now allow us to infer whose remains have been found, for example, at a mass grave or an anonymous tomb, and to extrapolate where they lived, their physical appearance, or their family origin.
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la Pedraja brains

Forensic sciences make it possible to obtain evidence specifically for forensic archaeology and forensic anthropology. In Spain, the study of the brains in La Pedraja is a way to deepen forensic investigation some 80 years after the original events occurred.
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Osteological collections

One of the main pillars of bioanthropological studies are identified osteological collections. The goal of this article is to describe this heritage and show its importance.
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fallen soldiers WWI

Archaeology and anthropology have played an important role in identifying World War I soldiers. In this process of identification, the involvement of forensic or conflict archaeologists and forensic anthropologists has played an invaluable role to provide a dignified burial to those who fell for their country.
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The Roman necropolis in Carrer Quart in Valencia (Spain) is the city’s oldest known cemetery. Based on its archaeological and bioanthropological analysis, we examine various hitherto unknown issues: funerary practices, social stratification, paleodemography, quality of life, and the impact of disease, food, and the subsistence economy.
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science and historical memory Alex Frances

This monograph offers a multidisciplinary overview of a diverse historical memory, analysed from different but complementary scientific perspectives, where history, archaeology, physical anthropology, forensic medicine, criminalistics, and genetics, among other sciences, intertwine to shed light and evidential value based on the biological vestiges of the past.
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dna fragment

It is clear that the term synthetic biology raises expectations, but it is no less true that it also causes concern. This article starts with a critique of the identification of cells as machines and discusses the current scope of synthetic biology and efforts to standardise it. We also outline some of the social implications of attempts to manufacture life.
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Energy is the blood that moves today’s society and is one of the factors that has decisively contributed to improving humanity’s quality of life. This paper addresses the potential challenges and opportunities in the development of global energy systems, emphasising how deeply interconnected the energy and climate debates are.
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We are living through a crisis which we call Anthropocene. Even though we study their ecological impact, their causes are social: the destruction of cultures and biodiversity is the heritage of colonialism, although it is now following different paths or being played out by different actors.
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Guaranteeing access to food for a growing human population – based on sustainability criteria and in the face of the climate change threat – is the main challenge for twenty-first-century agriculture. The solutions are inevitably complex, require a variety of coordinated measures, and are dependent on the development of technologies.
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Can humans control the future evolution of our species? Based on current knowledge in genetics, one can infer and extrapolate what may happen in the near future. After all, if we are to predict the future, we must first understand the foundations of our present.
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Adults and older people have most likely always wondered how the young will manage to survive in the world they are left with, and at this point in history, this is a central question in our debates. In order to resolve it, we must resort to one of the main tools we have devised to try to understand the world we live in, the one we call science.
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On the occasion of the 100th issue of Mètode, we present reflections on some of these challenges, such as food and energy production, the processing of information, genetic modification, or synthetic biology.
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Social networks and robotic company

The growing interaction with machines poses several questions about which we have no previous experience, nor can we reliably predict how they will influence the evolution of society.
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Robotics and automation and artificial intelligence technologies hold immense potential in addressing many of the societal challenges as exemplified in the sustainable development goals of the 2030 agenda of the United Nations.
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Some say that a humanoid should have a «full body» including two arms and legs, exactly like a human. This article intends to cover research on humanoid robotics in a broad manner.
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Brain-computer interfaces allow the control of devices without the generation of any active motor output but directly from the decoding of the user’s brain signals.

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Deep learning is an undeniably hot topic. However, interestingly, the current success and practice of deep learning seems to be uncorrelated with its theoretical, more formal understanding.
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Image - artificial intelligence

The ultimate objective of the field of artificial intelligence (AI), the creation of a machine with a general intelligence like that of humans, is one of the most ambitious scientific goals ever set.

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Mètode SSJ's monograph tries to offer a general overview of the world of robotics and artificial intelligence from the perspective of six experts on the field.
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In the 1980s, three sub-disciplines of ecology emerged – restoration ecology, conservation biology, and invasion biology – and all three embraced the nativism paradigm.
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