Etiqueta: women and science

Doctor with a patient
The science of difference

Women remained invisible in health sciences until the late twentieth century because they were not included in the cohorts used in researched studies. Thanks to the work done by different groups of feminist researchers, we were able to visualise the need to change those paradigms.

Interview with Londa Schiebinger

We meet Londa Schiebinger in Paris after her participation in the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education, organised by the French National Centre for Scientific Research. Since 2011, this researcher and professor of History of Science of Stanford University (California, United States)

Doctoral thesis defence
Breaking the glass ceiling

Women make up the majority of the university students at the beginning, but are progressively overtaken by their male colleagues, until they become an invisible minority in the highest levels of the system.

SheScience

With the title of this monograph, SheScience, we want to delve on these two aspects. We are committed to science done by women in the same numbers and hierarchy as men, and to science that reveals differential characteristics between women and men, and those other aspects that are specific to women. Both often ignored.

Jocelyn Bell
Interview with Jocelyn Bell

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] In the summer of 1967, the then PhD student Jocelyn Bell was analysing the records of a new radio telescope at the University of Cambridge when she detected some unusual signs, very slight but regular. One of the options that were being considered at that

Cordelia Fine
Interview with Cordelia Fine

New arguments for old stereotypes. That’s how professor Cordelia Fine describes «neurosexism», a term referring to the use of neuroscience to justify traditional gender role models, models that do not include the stereotype of the female scientist. That might somewhat explain the poor presence of

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Women… courageous and wise

Until relatively recently, women have had problems gaining access to jobs traditionally taken by men such as medicine, professorships and research. Some women, however, like the three given as examples in this article, managed to become pioneers in the most difficult disciplines and areas requiring utmost dedication.