Etiqueta: women and science

Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein/ Wikimedia
Einstein Maric, an unsolved equation

Mileva Maric was a notorious mathematician and Einstein's first wife. Although her figure is not well known, there is a big debate regarding her role in Einstein's Nobel Prize for Physics.

Crazy about science

The general model for evaluating scientific production fits into the accountability system: a way of measuring scientific output which does not usually acknowledge the presence of gender imbalances in academic institutions. Here we take the need to rethink this system and the indicators it uses

Rita Levi-Montalcini: Jewish, woman and scientist

Rita Levi-Montalcini’s life can be summarised in a single sentence: more than one century of struggle. Levi-Montalcini lived a hundred-year life during which she had to overcome, one by one, many obstacles keeping her from fully realising her personal project. Many would have given up

Women and science

Women have been traditionally excluded from the public sphere – education, politics, art and culture – and confined to the domestic sphere. This situation has experimented a slow steady change in different areas since the late modern period. A more liberal society has allowed the progressive incorporation of women to public life.

Doctor with a patient
The science of difference

Women remained invisible in health sciences until the late twentieth century because they were not included in the cohorts used in researched studies. Thanks to the work done by different groups of feminist researchers, we were able to visualise the need to change those paradigms.

Interview with Londa Schiebinger

We meet Londa Schiebinger in Paris after her participation in the 9th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education, organised by the French National Centre for Scientific Research. Since 2011, this researcher and professor of History of Science of Stanford University (California, United States)

Doctoral thesis defence
Breaking the glass ceiling

Women make up the majority of the university students at the beginning, but are progressively overtaken by their male colleagues, until they become an invisible minority in the highest levels of the system.