Women in science

Women in science

On 11 February, we celebrate the International Day of Women and Girls in Science with the aim of eliminating gender stereotypes in the field of science and technology.

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Rosalind Franklin, beyond the legend

The role of the victim assigned to Rosalind Franklin in the legend of the double helix should not overshadow her brilliant contributions, which are often ignored when her scientific career is outlined.

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Interview with Elizabeth Rasekoala

Elizabeth Rasekoala, chemical engineer and president of African Gong, has been awarded for her fight for diversity, sociocultural, and gender inclusion, in science learning, practice, and communication in Africa.

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Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein

The story of Mileva Marić

It is currently widely believed that Einstein’s first wife, Mileva Marić, made significant contributions to his scientific work. But, is there good evidence that Mileva Marić was Einstein’s secret collaborator?

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Mercedes Maestre: revolution from healthcare

Mercedes Maestre was a republican doctor who developed exceptional activism for social reform and the right to health.

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Angela Saini

Interview with Angela Saini

Interview with Angela Saini, scientific journalist (United Kingdom) and author of the book Inferior (2017).

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Hildegard

In late-Middle-Age Central European monasteries, nuns like Hildegard von Bingen rivaled monks in intellectual excellence.

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Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein/ Wikimedia

Einstein Maric, an unsolved equation

Mileva Maric was a notorious mathematician and Einstein's first wife. Although her figure is not well known, there is a big debate regarding her role in Einstein's Nobel Prize for Physics.

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The presence of women in scientific careers is more and more significant every day. / Pixabay

Four female voices in science

Obstacles, virtues and experiences derived from being a woman in science.

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«Las mujeres de la Luna», by Daniel Roberto Altschuler and Fernando Ballesteros

Out of 1,600 craters in total, only 28 have a woman's name. The book calls attention to this and pays homage to these often forgotten historical figures.

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