Etiqueta: ethnobotany

Edible Childhood Ethnobotany

[caption id="attachment_14781" align="alignleft" width="200"] Guildhall Art Gallery (Londres)John Everett Millais. The Woodsman's Daughter, 1850-51. Oil on canvas, 64,7 x 88,9 cm. The author describes a countryside scene with a boy offering strawberries, possibly wild.[/caption] The abandonment of rural areas and the interruption of intergenerational oral transmission have created

Lady’s slipper
A Mythical Flower

Rare and funny, Lady’s slipper (or Cuckoo’s slipper) is good at playing hide and seek. From the eighteenth century it appeared in botanical publications to then vanish into a long silence denying its existence in the Pyrenees.

Protecting Biodiversity

The global debate on biodiversity has inevitably led us to consider traditional knowledge of plants, ethnobotany’s basic corpus, as an inseparable part of this discipline. This fact was amply recognised by the Convention on Biodiversity. Furthermore, ethnobotanical knowledge can and should be used to achieve sustainable development that is compatible with the conservation of biodiversity.

Post Feature Image
Beloved Botany

Ethnobotany, the study of relationships between human societies and plants, is a discipline at the crossroads between natural sciences and social sciences. Such interdisciplinarity or transdisciplinarity breaches a purely scientific paradigm to bring researchers together from fields as diverse as anthropology...

pomegranate tree
The pomegranate tree

The pomegranate tree appears to be native from the shores of the Caspian Sea, the plains in Iran and the mountains in Kurdistan and Afganistan, where it grows wild in rocky places. From there, Phoenicians spread its farming all around the shores of the Mediterranean.

Glowing Figs

The fig tree (Ficus carica L.) —figuera in Catalan, higuera in Spanish, figuier in French and fico in Italian—, is a tortuous branch tree with profitable fruits. It is odorous and generally small, although some specimens can reach up to five metres of height and of crown width. Its leaves, palmately shaped, deciduous and lobulated, are rough to the touch.