Etiqueta: astrophysics

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What is a supermoon?

According to the astrophysicist and communicator Javier Armentia, supermoons do not really exist. As he explains, the term is not astronomical, but vulgar astrology.

Unravelling science

Mètode Science Studies Journal publishes the 2017 annual review, under the title Unravelling science. The seventh issue of this English language publication focuses on the secrets of neuroscience, the connection between science and ideology, science from a gender perspective, and twenty-first century astrophysics and cosmology,

Astronomy and space on the big screen

Since its origins, cinema has been fascinated with the subject of scientific developments. In particular, astronomy and astrophysics have played an important role in science fiction stories about space travel and exploration. Though the science has not always been accurately represented, in the last decades

Space, time, and irreversibility

Scientific philosophy is that which is informed by science. It uses exact tools such as logic and mathematics and provides a framework for scientific activity to solve more general questions about nature, the language we use to describe it, and the knowledge we obtain thanks

Violent universe

We see the sky and admire its regularity and stability, its apparent immutability. We have always done so; it does not come as a surprise, since humans have always been startled by any change in the sky, associating it with omens or the mood swings of gods. At that time, they might call these changes «new stars», even if they were, for example, a supernova explosion, as in the case of Tycho’s supernova in the sixteenth century.

Jocelyn Bell
Interview with Jocelyn Bell

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] In the summer of 1967, the then PhD student Jocelyn Bell was analysing the records of a new radio telescope at the University of Cambridge when she detected some unusual signs, very slight but regular. One of the options that were being considered at that

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Faster than Light

ESA/Hubble & NASA Travelling at hyperluminal speeds would open to humanity the possibility of exploring the whole galaxy, and even, perhaps, other galaxies. In the image, the UGC 12158, photographed by the Hubble space telescope. It is believed to be a virtual