Etiqueta: forensic

dna human remains
DNA rewriting our memory

Technological advances in the study of our genome now allow us to infer whose remains have been found, for example, at a mass grave or an anonymous tomb, and to extrapolate where they lived, their physical appearance, or their family origin.

Osteological collections
A particular heritage

One of the main pillars of bioanthropological studies are identified osteological collections. The goal of this article is to describe this heritage and show its importance.

Memory written in bones

The Roman necropolis in Carrer Quart in Valencia (Spain) is the city’s oldest known cemetery. Based on its archaeological and bioanthropological analysis, we examine various hitherto unknown issues: funerary practices, social stratification, paleodemography, quality of life, and the impact of disease, food, and the subsistence economy.

efecte CSI
Beyond the CSI effect

Forensic genetics brings together all the genetic knowledge required to solve specific legal problems. In recent decades new techniques have shown the potential of DNA as a profiling system.

Ciència i memòria / Lican Esteve (underbox.site)
Science and memory

Violence resulting from armed and political conflicts has led many societies to carry with them the suffering of those who have disappeared. This issue is dedicated to the role played by social and forensic sciences in the service of shed light on memory. Deadline for submission: 1 December 2018.