José Antonio Font

Tenured professor of Physics at the University of Valencia (Spain). His field of research is relativistic astrophysics and in particular, he studies neutron stars, black holes, and gravitational radiation using computational tools such as relativistic hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics and numerical relativity. He was the president of the Spanish Society of Gravitation and Relativity and now coordinates the Valencia group for the Virgo collaboration and directs the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the University of Valencia.

We see the sky and admire its regularity and stability, its apparent immutability. We have always done so; it does not come as a surprise, since humans have always been startled by any change in the sky, associating it with omens or the mood swings of gods. At that time, they might call these changes «new stars», even if they were, for example, a supernova explosion, as in the case of Tycho’s supernova in the sixteenth century.
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In this article, we summarise several of the most well-known astrophysical scenarios, and offer a brief description of what we currently know about them.
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