Editorial no. 101

Science and memory: this is the content of the current issue of Mètode, coordinated by archaeologist Elisa García-Prósper and forensic doctor Manolo Polo-Cerdá. In their article, Polo-Cerdá and García-Prósper write about the foundational necropolis of Valencia and all the data that their study has provided about who were the first settlers of Roman Valentia, how they lived and how they died. Ana Luisa Santos, professor at the University of Coimbra, deals in her text with the importance of identified osteological collections for forensic disciplines. Dr. Nicholas Márquez-Grant and his team from Cranfield University analyze the protocols followed to find, exhume, and identify the remains of World War I soldiers throughout Europe. Fernando Serrulla, medical doctor and forensic anthropologist at the Institute of Legal Medicine of Galicia, and Francisco Etxeberria, forensic scientist and professor at the University of the Basque Country, bring us the fascinating case of the brains preserved in a mass grave after the Civil War, an example of how science can help solve injustices decades after the facts. Finally, the professor of Legal Medicine Ángel Carracedo and the expert geneticist Mercedes Aler discover the different types of genetic analysis that are revolutionising the identification of missing persons. All this is illustrated by the Valencian artist Alex Francés who, with a conceptual and risky perception, creates works overflowing with tension and internal breath.

Finally, this 101st issue of Mètode welcomes four new contributors: Gemma Marfany, with the section «Genes and origins», which will deal with genetics; Enric Marco, with «Trench astronomy», dedicated to observing the sky; Xurxo Mariño, with the space «Dark matter», where he will reflect on neuroscience; and M. Alma Bracho, who will talk about epidemics and viruses in «Invisible monsters». Mètode reinvents itself to put science at the service of citizens.

© Mètode 2019 - 101. The memory of bones - Volume II (2019)