Roberto García-Roa
Researcher in evolutionary biology at Lund University (Sweden) and nature and conservation photographer. Among other awards, his photographic work has won the British Ecological Society’s Capturing Ecology competition three times.
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There is a great diversity of organisms that have adapted to live among us. Not only arthropods, but also vertebrates such as geckos, bats, owls and, in some highly urbanised countries, even foxes, deer, and bears.
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Interview with Cristina Mittermeier, conservation biologist and photographer. She shares her projects, which combine both of her professional interests.
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Ximpanzé

The International Union for Conservation of Nature has listed them as «endangered». In particular, the West African subspecies – the one pictured here – is listed as «critically endangered».
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Photography has positioned itself not only as an effective means of collecting data, but also as a tool for sharing scientific information, both inside and outside the academic world.
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The search for certainty in a world that is often so binary – where choosing between two options seems to be the better (and

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Dead Vlei

Dead Vlei is a natural treasure capable of thrilling any nature lover. Located in Namibia’s Namib-Naukluft National Park, it is guarded by some of the largest dunes on the planet.
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Ants are as common as they are special. They can be found in nearly every corner of the Earth, and their ability to organise themselves is remarkable.

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The trade in wild species generates great economic wealth on a global scale. The regulation of this trade must take into account many complexities.

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Our empathy for other organisms decreases the further they are removed from us on the tree of life. Photography can change this perception.
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Valenciolenda fadaforesta

The description of the «Valencian wood fairy» or Valenciolenda fadaforesta (Hoch & Sendra), a new species and genus, was recently published.
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